Suburb in the spotlight

Hamilton Hill 

The earliest known settler at Hamilton Hill was Sydney Smith, the agent of Captain George Robb. Robb arrived in Western Australia in 1830 and took up land south of Fremantle. During the next 12 months Smith was actively engaged in establishing Robb's farm. In a letter dated 27 August 1830, he gives his address as Hamilton Hill. The name Hamilton is derived from the Hamilton Ross Company of Cape Town which operated the 'Leda', the ship that brought Robb and Smith to Western Australia. The founder of the company, Hamilton Ross, had been born in Galway, Ireland in 1775, into a family that had moved from Scotland about two generations prior to his birth. The first master of the 'Leda' had been Captain John Northwood and several of Hamilton Ross's nephews were indentured to become master mariners on the 'Leda', including Richard Hamilton Allen, whose son, William Hamilton Allen, later settled in Western Australia.

See statistics for Hamilton Hill

Aerial image of Hamilton Hill

Infographic for Hamilton Hill

The Perth suburb of Hamilton Hill measures 6.615 square kilometres. It has a total population of 9,855 people, of which 49.5% are male and 50.5% are female. 62.5% of residents were born in Australia, while 37.5% were born elsewhere. There has been a 10.1% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $600,000 and there have been 31 property sales to date in 2015.

Applecross

The area now comprising the suburb of Applecross was originally part of Swan Location 61 assigned to Lionel Lukin on the 28th May 1830. The land was finally acquired by Sir Alexander Percival Matheson in February 1896. Matheson, a Scot, formed the Western Australian Investment Company Limited and instigated the subdivision of the area, giving it the name of Applecross after a small fishing village on the North west coast of Scotland.

Aerial photograph of Applecross

Applecross statistics (see below)


The Perth suburb of Applecross measures 3169 square kilometres. It has a total population of 6579 people, of which 48.7% are male and 51.3% are female. 55.7% of residents were born in Australia, while 36.4% were born elsewhere. There has been a 1.5% growth in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $1.7 million and there have been nine property sales to date in 2015.

Attadale

The land comprising the suburb was granted to Archibald Butler in 1830 and was acquired by the Scotsman, Sir Alexander Percival Matheson in 1896. Matheson is believed to have named Attadale after a small town in Scotland on the eastern shores of Lock Carron, not far from Applecross.

Aerial image of Attadale 

Infographic of Attadale

The Perth suburb of Attadale measures 3.22 square kilometres. It has a total population of 6060 people, of which 47.12% are male and 52.87% are female. 69.84% of residents were born in Australia, while 30.15% were born elsewhere. There has been a 1.2% increase in the median house price from 2013 – 2014. The median house price is $1,301,000 and there have been 8 sales to date in 2015

Baldivis

This suburb was one of the State Government's Group Settlement schemes which was implemented in the 1920s to alleviate unemployment. A school building was completed and was given the name 'Baldivis' - a name coined by local settlers after three ships that brought them to WA in 1922, the 'Balranald', the 'Diogenes' and the 'Jervis Bay'. The most coincidental item is that all three ships were built in the same place and in the same year. Also, all of the vessels made their maiden voyage to WA within six weeks of each other.

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Aerial image of Baldivis

Baldivis Infographic 

The Perth suburb of Baldivis measures 86.892 square kilometres. It has a total population of 15,883 people, of which 49.4% are male and 50.6% are female. 66.7% of residents were born in Australia, while 33.3% were born elsewhere. There has been a 0.6% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $470,000 and there have been 106 property sales to date in 2015.

Bassendean

The name 'Bassendean' was first recorded by Surveyor JW Gregory in 1841 as the name of 1455 acres for Mr P Brown, who had his homestead on the West Bank of Swan River. Peter Brown (or Broun) was WA's first Colonial Secretary in 1832 and apparently named his property on the Swan River after a family property in England, Bassendean in Berwickshire. This area was also previously known as West Guildford. A competition to choose a new name for the area was held in 1922 and two school children nominated the name 'Bassendean' after Peter Brown's property.

Aerial photograph of Bassendean

Statistics for Bassendean 

The Perth suburb of Bassendean measures 7.332 square kilometres. It has a total population of 9640 people, of which 49.5% are male and 50.5% are female. 69.9% of residents were born in Australia, while 30.1% were born elsewhere. There has been a 3.7% growth in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $591 000 and there have been 16 property sales to date in 2015.

City Beach

The land where City Beach is located was originally the City Endowment Lands of the City of Perth. They were opened for development after World War 1 and soon became prize targets for speculators as values soared. In 1921 numerous names were suggested for the new development, then called 'Ocean Beach'. A popular name was 'Swansea', being made up of the two words, Swan, representing the Swan River and Sea, being the Indian Ocean. 'Templetonia' was also suggested, this being the name of a red flower which grew in the district. Both were rejected before the present name was adopted. It appears that this name was used because it was an area developed by the Perth City Council, and much more descriptive than 'Ocean Beach'. The first sale of land in the estate took place on 9 February 1929.

Aerial photograph of the suburb of City Beach

Statistics about City Beach. See description below.

The Perth suburb of City Beach measures 9.807 square kilometres. It has a total population of 6354 people, of which 49.1% are male and 50.9% are female. 68.8% of residents were born in Australia, while 31.1% were born elsewhere. There has been a 4.3% decrease in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $1.67m and there have been nine property sales to date in 2015.

Cottesloe

In September 1886, the Commissioner of Crown Lands, John Forrest, announced his intention of subdividing an area of Crown Land between Perth and Fremantle into suburban lots and asked His Excellency, Governor Sir Frederick Napier Broome, to suggest a name. The Governor suggested 'Cottesloe' on 21 September after "the title lately bestowed on a member of the Fremantle family". 'Cottesloe' was named after Thomas Francis Fremantle, Lord Cottesloe.

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Infographic for Cottesloe

The Perth suburb of Cottesloe measures 3.751 square kilometres. It has a total population of 7,398 people, of which 48.8% are male and 51.2% are female. 74.3% of residents were born in Australia, while 25.7% were born elsewhere. There has been a 1.30% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $1,975,000 and there have been 29 property sales to date in 2015.

Darlington

The name 'Darlington' is derived from adding the English suffix 'ton' meaning 'town' to the name of the range in the area - Darling Range. This range was first named 'General Darling Range' by Charles Fraser, Government Botanist with Captain James Stirling in 1827 after the Governor of the parent colony in New South Wales, General Sir Ralph Darling. The name was first used by Dr Alfred Waylen who established the 'Darlington Vineyard' here in 1883-4.

Aerial image of Darlington

Statistics about Darlington. See description below. 

The Perth suburb of Darlington measures 12 102 square kilometres. It has a total population of 3524 people, of which 49.4% are male and 50.6% are female. 67.2% of residents were born in Australia, while 32.8% were born elsewhere. There has been a 6% increase in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $620 000 and there have been five property sales to date in 2015.

Dianella

'Dianella' is the botanical name of a small plant which grew in profusion in the area prior to development. It flowers in spring with a star-like purple flower which develops into a blue berry. The Dianella area began developing in the late 1950s, and the name for the suburb was adopted in 1958.

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Infographic of Dianella

The Perth suburb of Dianella measures 10.707 square kilometres. It has a total population of 22,521 people, of which 48.2% are male and 51.8% are female. 58.9% of residents were born in Australia, while 41.1% were born elsewhere. There has been a 6.8% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $763,300 and there have been 60 property sales to date in 2015.

East Victoria Park

Development of the suburb of East Victoria Park commenced in the late 1800s. An estate named Bickford was promoted there and used 'Victoria Park East' to describe its location.

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Aerial image of East Victoria Park

Infographic for East Victoria Park

The Perth suburb of East Victoria Park measures 3.729 square kilometres. It has a total population of 7398 people, of which 50.6% are male and 49.4% are female. 58.5% of residents were born in Australia, while 41.5% were born elsewhere. There has been a 4.60% decrease in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $720,000 and there have been 24 property sales to date in 2015.

Forrestfield

Local folklore suggests that the name comes from Charles Hale who settled here in 1902 and planted a crop amongst the trees. A neighbour referred to him wanting a forest and a field at the same time and the name was later applied to the area. It is believed however, to honour John or Alexander Forrest, although their connection with the area has not been established. A Forrest Field Progress Association was formed as early as 1927 and the name is shown on plans as Forrestfield for 1944.

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Aerial image of Forrestfield

Infographic for Forrestfield

The Perth suburb of Forrestfield measures 18.621 square kilometres. It has a total population of 11,811 people, of which 49.4% are male and 50.6% are female. 71.6% of residents were born in Australia, while 28.4% were born elsewhere. There has been a 6% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $461,000 and there have been 20 property sales to date in 2015.

Ellenbrook

Ellenbrook is named after a woman (very few suburbs are). It takes its name from the feature Ellen Brook, which was named by Lt Stirling in 1827 after his wife, Ellen Stirling. It was approved as a suburb name in 1990.

Areial photograph of the suburb of Ellenbrook 

Statistics for Ellenbrook. See description below. 

The Perth suburb of Ellenbrook measures 14.364 square kilometres. It has a total population of 16 284 people, of which 48.5% are male and 51.5% are female. 68.5% of residents were born in Australia, while 31.5% were born elsewhere. There has been a 3.30% increase in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $450 000 and there have been 71 property sales to date in 2015.

Fremantle

The town of Fremantle was named by Lt. Gov. Stirling in honour of the master of the escort ship "HMS Challenger", Captain Charles Howe Fremantle. He was the son of a British Admiral and younger brother of Baron Cottesloe of Swanbourne, Buckinghamshire, England. Captain Fremantle arrived at the colony of Western Australia on 2 May 1829 after being dispatched from the Cape of Good Hope on 20 March 1829, by Commodore Schomberg of the India Squadron. He took formal possession in the name of King GeorgeIV of "all that part of New Holland which is not included within the territory of New South Wales".

The first colonists who arrived with Captain Stirling in 1829 camped on Garden Island until preparations for their arrival on the mainland were completed. They started coming ashore in August 1829 near Arthurs Head, camping in the shelter of that hill on the south bank of the Swan River. Though many colonists continued up river with Stirling to what was to become Perth, many stayed by the coast to establish Fremantle, the port of the City of Perth. No record exists of the official naming of the proposed town as Fremantle. There is also no actual date of declaration of the townsite, but the first lots were sold on 5 September 1829, and this is the first recording of the name in official records. The name Fremantle has at various times and in various records been incorrectly spelt Freemantle.

The Aboriginal name for the Fremantle area was listed in 1833 as "Walyalup".

Aerial photograph of the suburb of Fremantle 

Statistics on Fremantle (see detailed description below) 

The Perth suburb of Fremantle measures 5.532 square kilometres. It has a total population of 7669 people, of which 49.9% are male and 50.1% are female. 62.8% of residents were born in Australia, while 37.2% were born elsewhere. There has been an 11.3% decrease in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $847 500 and there have been 21 property sales to date in 2015.

Gosnells 

Development of the district of Gosnells dates back to 1829 when the rich soils and abundant waters of the Canning River attracted early settlers. One of the early pioneers was John Okey Davis who arrived in WA with his wife and seven children on the ship 'Lotus' in 1829. Davis' land was eventually sold to Charles Gosnell in 1862. Gosnells was a director of a famous London firm of John Gosnell and Co., perfumery manufacturers, and it was from this association that the name of the area originated.

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Aerial image of Gosnells

Infographic for Gosnells

The Perth suburb of Gosnells measures 15.472 square kilometres. It has a total population of 19,169 people, of which 49.6% are male and 50.4% are female. 67% of residents were born in Australia, while 33% were born elsewhere. There has been a 5.6% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $395,500 and there have been 56 property sales to date in 2015.

Guildford

The history of the suburb of Guildford had its beginnings in 1827 when Captain James Stirling was despatched by Governor Darling of New South Wales to explore part of the West Coast of Australia. Whilst exploring the Swan River, Stirling was favourably impressed by the fertile alluvial flats around the area now known as Guildford, and replenished his water supplies from Success Spring at Success Hill on the west bank of the Swan River at Bassendean. The junction of the Swan and Helena Rivers was also chosen as the site for a town, and the first surveys were carried out in the Town of Guildford in late 1829.

The name, Guildford, was given by Sir James Stirling after the English town 43 km south west of London where he was married in 1823. His property was named "Woodbridge" after Woodbridge, Guildford in Surrey, the property of his wife's family. The Aboriginal name for the Guildford area is "Mandoon".

Aerial photograph of the suburb of Guildford

Statistics about Guildford (see detailed statistics below)

The Perth suburb of Guildford measures 3.065 square kilometres. It has a total population of 1882 people, of which 53% are male and 47% are female. 72% of residents were born in Australia, while 28% were born elsewhere. There has been a 4.5% decrease in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $620 000 and there have been six property sales to date in 2015.

Hillarys

This suburb name was proposed by the Shire of Wanneroo in 1970 in honour of Bertram John Hillary, a Gallipoli war veteran who died in 1957 at the age of 62, and who set up the first beach shack on a lonely stretch of beach in 1930. That lonely stretch of beach eventually came to be named after its earliest known inhabitant, courtesy of the Army which had use of the land during World War 2.

Prior to being named Hillarys, the area was sometimes referred to as Whitfords or Whitfords Beach. In 1927 Whitfords Ltd, a development company owned by Frank Whitfords purchased a large property of 3,200 acres and planned an extensive development to include a golf course, tennis courts, holiday cottages and shops. Whitfords' plans never came to fruition, but by 1928 the area was referred to as Whitfords Beach, it was a popular fishing spot and shacks were soon being built in the area. Whitfords Ltd was wound up in 1936.

In 1971 the Corridor Plan for Perth was published, and the area originally known as Whitfords was rezoned for urban development to ultimately house 50,000 people. The planned development was referred to as Whitfords, but it was divided into four distinct suburbs named Hillarys, Craigie, Padbury and Kallaroo. The name Whitfords was retained as one of the major arteries, Whitfords Avenue, and also the name of the main shopping centre for the area.

The streets of Hillarys are named after early Antarctic explorers, land explorers and surveyors.

Aerial imagery of the suburb of Hillarys

Statistics about Hillarys (see detailed statistics below) 

The Perth suburb of Hillarys measures 6.252 square kilometres. It has a total population of 10680 people, of which 49.8% are male and 50.2% are female. 61.9% of residents were born in Australia, while 38.1% were born elsewhere. There has been a 2.9% increase in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $900,000 and there have been 10 property sales to date in 2015.

Innaloo

The area of this suburb was originally known by the Aboriginal name 'Njookenbooroo' (sometimes spelt Ngurgenboro or Noorgenboro). This name was too difficult to pronounce or spell, and in 1927 an alternative name was sought. A list of Aboriginal words compiled by Daisy Bates was provided and 'Innaloo', the name of an Aboriginal woman from Dongara was chosen. The name was approved in 1927.

Aerial imagery of the suburb of Innaloo

Innaloo statistics (see below)

The Perth suburb of Innaloo measures 3.090 square kilometres. It has a total population of 7648 people, of which 47.4% are male and 52.6% are female. 64.8% of residents were born in Australia, while 35.2% were born elsewhere. There has been a 10.5% increase in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $845,000 and there have been 14 property sales to date in 2015.

Joondalup

This suburb is named after Lake Joondalup, situated on the eastern side of the suburb. Joondalup is an Aboriginal word first recorded in 1837, and possibly means "place of of whiteness or glistening". Another account states that a 'joondal' is a creature that can only move backwards.

Aerial imagery of the suburb of Joondalup

Joondalup statistics (see below)

The Perth suburb of Joondalup measures 12.736 square kilometres. It has a total population of 9197 people, of which 49.8% are male and 50.2% are female. 49.9% of residents were born in Australia, while 50.1% were born elsewhere. There has been a 3.6% increase in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $575,000 and there have been 11 property sales to date in 2015.

Kalamunda

This suburb was named in 1901 following a request by 32 residents of the area for a townsite to be declared here. The residents chose the name 'Calamunda' as the name of the proposed townsite, combining two Aboriginal words recorded in a book on Aboriginal language by Bishop Salvado. 'Cala' signifies 'home, district, settlement' and 'Munda' signifies 'forest' and the residents hoped it would be considered an appropriate name. The name was respelt 'Kalamunnda' by the Surveyor General, but later in 1901 was amended to Kalamunda.

Aerial imagery of the suburb of Kalamunda

Kalamunda statistics (see below)

The Perth suburb of Kalamunda measures 10.579 square kilometres. It has a total population of 6636 people, of which 48.5% are male and 51.5% are female. 62.9% of residents were born in Australia, while 37.1% were born elsewhere. There has been a 7.7% increase in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $675,200 and there have been 8 property sales to date in 2015.

Leederville

Leederville is named after William Leeder, the first landowner in the area. He arrived in the colony on the 'Rockingham' in 1830, and in 1833 bought land near Lake Monger. Private subdivision began about 1890 and the expanding district was already known as Leederville in April 1895 when it was declared as a Roads Board District. It was gazetted as a municipality on 3 May 1896.

Aerial photograph of the suburb of Leederville

Statistics for the suburb of Leederville (see full description below)

The Perth suburb of Leederville measures 1.456 square kilometres. It has a total population of 2943 people, of which 50% are male and 50% are female. 61.9% of residents were born in Australia, while 38.1% were born elsewhere. There has been a 4.60% decrease in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $870,000 and there have been 10 property sales to date in 2015.

Mount Pleasant

The name Mt Pleasant was once a quite common name in WA and Australia. Before Mt Pleasant was opened as an estate in 1923 there was in WA a school near Wagin, a hotel, a mine, and it is/was a popular farm name. There are currently six places named Mount Pleasant in Australia, two in Queensland, and one in each of WA, SA, NSW and VIC.

The first settlers in our Mt. Pleasant area were Alfred Waylen and William Tanner, whose property extended east and included the present day suburb of Applecross. The northern part of Mount Pleasant was developed in the 1890's by the Scotsman, Sir Alexander Matheson, but was regarded as part of Applecross at that time. In 1911, James Herbert Simson built a house by the river on 40 acres which, because of its shape, became known as the Castle on the Hill. Simson apparently named it "Mt. Pleasant" (it has not been possible to confirm this), the name which now adorns the suburb.

The first development in Mount Pleasant was in 1923, when an estate of 121 blocks costing around 25 pounds were advertised for sale. The estate was described in the following glowing terms in the "Daily News" in February 1923 – "Mount Pleasant is undeniably the most picturesque river location in the West. It is situated by the riverside about a mile from Messrs. Sutton and Olson's ferries, at Canning Bridge, and the distance between Mount Pleasant and the ferries can be comfortably walked within 20 minutes. The estate rises gently from a pretty foreshore, and before reaching the summit there can be plainly seen the suburbs of Como, South Perth, and the city of Perth. From Mount Pleasant are presented river bends and reaches not to be matched anywhere along the river. There has just been completed a splendid road along the riverside right to the estate".

Aerial photograph of the suburb of Mount Pleasant

Statistics for the suburb of Mount Pleasant (see full description below) 

The Perth suburb of Mount Pleasant measures 2.809 square kilometres. It has a total population of 6496 people, of which 48.2% are male and 51.8% are female. 62.2% of residents were born in Australia, while 37.8% were born elsewhere. There has been a 2% decrease in the median house price in the past 12 months. The median house price is $1.35M and there have been 9 property sales to date in 2015.

Nedlands

In 1854, Colonel John Bruce, Military Commandant of the Colony, brought land in this area, intending the land to be the heritage of his son Edward. He is said to have referred to the estate as "Ned's Land". Edward Bruce, later Major Edward Bruce of the 19th Bengal Lancers, visited Western Australia in 1883 and on a mortgage dated 29th June in that year, the various locations left to him by his father are described as being the land "known as Nedlands". Development of the area mainly occurred between 1910 and 1920.

Aerial photograph of the suburb of Nedlands

Statistics on the suburb of Nedlands (see description below)

The Perth suburb of Nedlands measures 5.325 square kilometres. It has a total population of 10,184 people, of which 48.6% are male and 51.4% are female. 64.3% of residents were born in Australia, while 35.7% were born elsewhere. There has been a 9.2% increase in the median house price from 2013-14. The median house price is $1.67M and there have been 15 property sales to date in 2015.

Orelia

Orelia is one of the suburbs of Kwinana named after a ship. Medina, Parmelia, Calista, Leda and Orelia are all named after ships that brought early settlers to Western Australia. The "Orelia" arrived at Fremantle in October 1829 bringing settlers to the new colony, the ship regularly visiting the Australian ports of Sydney, Hobart and Fremantle for some years. Development began on the first two suburbs, Medina and Calista in 1952, and Orelia in the late 1960s. The development of the area was planned by the town planner, Margaret Feilman.

Aerial image of Orelia

Infographic image of Orelia

The Perth suburb of Orelia measures 2.73  square kilometres. It has a total population of 4679  people, of which 50.4% are male and 49.6% are female. 69.8% of residents were born in Australia, while 30.2% were born elsewhere. There has been a 1.2% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $339,000 and there have been 12 property sales to date in 2015.

Palmyra

Palmyra, meaning City of Palms, was a famous Syrian city which was a trading centre on the trading routes of Ancient Europe. The name Palmyra was chosen for the Perth suburb via a competition. The following account of the naming appeared in "The West Australian" on 22 December 1902 on page 6: "A New Fremantle Townsite- Mrs. Thomson, of Brucetown, North Fremantle, is the winner of the prize offered by the owners of location 8, Cockburn Sound, for a suitable name for this large estate, which adjoins the eastern boundaries of Fremantle and East Fremantle. Palmyra is the name accepted,- and students of Roman History will find it interesting to read the references made to the ancient city of Palmyra, by Gibbon, in his history of "The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire." The ancient Palmyra was an oasis, or beauty spot, in the desert, and the vendors of this modern Palmyra are endeavouring to make this new townsite a beauty spot in the environs of Fremantle; good roads, street lamps, recreation grounds, etc., form part of the scheme to make Palmyra a delightful place of residence. Plans of subdivision are now available, and the date of the sale will be advertised at an early date". The street names selected for the estate, e.g. Zenobia, Cleopatra, Solomon, Aurelian, etc. are names associated with Ancient History in the Middle East area.

Aerial image of Palmyra

Infographic image of Palmyra

The Perth suburb of Palmyra measures 3.143 square kilometres. It has a total population of 6609  people, of which 46.4% are male and 53.6% are female. 72% of residents were born in Australia, while 28% were born elsewhere. There has been an 11.8% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $900,000 and there have been 15 property sales to date in 2015.

Quinns Rocks

This seaside suburb takes its name from the offshore reef first noted during a coastline survey by Surveyour James Cowle in 1867. Although spelt with a double "n", the rocks are thought to have been named after Robert Quin who immigrated to Western Australia in 1863 and was appointed as an Assistant Surveyor on his arrival. Quin died in July 1886. The general area on the coast opposite the rocks was referred to as Quinns Rocks by the Wanneroo Road Board when they requested the survey of a road to that place in November 1925. Later the place also came to be called "Wanneroo Beach". Quinns Rocks was declared a townsite in 1962.

Quinns Rocks aerial photograph

Infographic image of Quinns Rocks

The Perth suburb of Quinns Rocks measures 4.179 square kilometres. It has a total population of 8902 people, of which 49.5% are male and 50.5% are female. 58.9% of residents were born in Australia, while 41.1% were born elsewhere. There has been a 0.5% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $505,000 and there have been 13 property sales to date in 2015.

Rockingham

Rockingham received its name from the ship, "Rockingham", which ran aground on the beach which fronts the present day suburb in 1830. The "Rockingham" was a 423 tonne vessel, and was the last of three ships to bring Thomas Peel's settlers from London to the new Colony. The "Rockingham" arrived at Cockburn Sound in May 1830. The ship grounded on the beach when coming in to shore. Although initially salvaged, attempts to repair the ship on Garden Island failed. The hulk was later stripped of timber and copper sheathing and sunk in either Owen Anchorage or Careening Bay (Garden Island).

A site for a future town to be named Rockingham was surveyed in 1842, but as early as 1835 there are references to "Mr Peel's settlement at Rockingham Town" in the Perth Gazette. Surveys were made in 1846/7, but early growth was very slow, and it was 1872 before the first jetty was built, a second larger one following in 1882. Rockingham then experienced a boom period until the turn of the century when a drop in the number of vessels calling at the port became evident. The fate of Rockingham as a port was sealed in 1903 when Millars Karri and Jarrah Co (1902) Ltd. decided to use Bunbury as its port instead of Rockingham. During the next decade fewer ships called each year and Rockingham slowly developed into the seaside resort it is today. The district has grown in recent years, due largely to the growth of the Cockburn Sound Industrial Area at Kwinana.

Aerial image of Rockingham

Infographic image of Rockingham 

The Perth suburb of Rockingham measures 10.468 square kilometres. It has a total population of 14159 people, of which 49.4% are male and 50.6% are female. 60.2% of residents were born in Australia, while 39.8% were born elsewhere. There has been a 6.4% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $450,000 and there have been 28 property sales to date in 2015.

Scarborough

In 1885, a visiting Sydney journalist explored the coastline of Scarborough and gave much publicity to the high qualities of the ocean beach. Encouraged by the publicity, some Perth land and estate agents investigated the possibilities of the area. Eventually the land was sold to a Patrick Callaghan of Melbourne in October 1892. Callaghan subdivided the land and sold a few of the blocks in Melbourne and although it is not known if he advertised the land as "Scarborough" it is possible to attribute the origin of the name to him. He named one of the streets in his subdivision Scarborough Road, later to become Drabble Road and it is believed the name of the suburb originated from this road. It is probably derived from the English seaside town of the same name.

Aerial image of Scarborough

Infographic image of Scarborough

Success 

The suburb of Success is named after the ship commanded by Captain James Stirling when he visited and explored the Swan River in 1827. The name was approved for the suburb in 1973, although the boundaries have since been changed. In 1968 the PMG discussed the naming of the area with the Cockburn Shire Council who suggested "Omeo", apparently after a ship that went ashore at Coogee around the turn of the century. Investigation showed that this name was duplicated in Victoria and eventually, the name Success was proposed.

See statistics for Success

Aerial image of Success

Infographic for Success

The Perth suburb of Success measures 5.86 square kilometres. It has a total population of 8,511 people, of which 50% are male and 50% are female. 61.1% of residents were born in Australia, while 38.9% were born elsewhere. There has been a 4.5% increase in the median house price from 2013 - 2014. The median house price is $585,000 and there have been 21 property sales to date in 2015.

Thornlie

In December 1955, the then "Gosnells Road Board" wrote to the Nomenclature Advisory Committee informing them that a portion of Canning Location 17 had been approved for subdivision. They requested that the area be named Thornlie which appeared to be a name by which the whole estate was known in the early days. The name was approved in April 1956. One authority states the district was named after Thornlie Bank in Madras. When Padbury owned the property, it was run as an experimental farm by his niece's husband, Frank James, whose grandfather was in business at Thornlie Bank in Madras.

Aerial image of Thornlie

Infographic image of Thornlie

Victoria Park

The suburb of Victoria Park derives its name from "Victoria Park Estate", a development that took place here in the 1890's. It is believed the name was given to the estate because Queen Victoria was still on the throne, although it may be connected with the Melbourne suburb of Victoria Park. Victoria Park was declared a municipality in 1897.

Aerial image of Victoria Park

Statistics for Victoria Park

Wanneroo

In the early days of the Swan River Colony, the district of Wanneroo represented an "outer" region and it is not until 1834 that an excursion into the area by any explorers or settlers is recorded. In that year, a party of four led by John Butler, travelled about 35 miles north from Perth to search for lost cattle and passed through the area just to the east of Lake Joondalup. Butler stated that the aborigines of the area were "those Wanneroo men who frequent Perth in company with the Yellowgonga tribe." 

It is not known when early settlers started using the name "Wanneroo", but, as early as 1842, a Surveyor recorded "road to Wanneroo" and in 1844, James Dobbins gave his address as Wanneroo. A government townsite was gazetted as "Wanneru" in August 1907 and it was not until May 1953 that the spelling was amended to "Wanneroo".

Aerial image of Wanneroo

Infographic for Wanneroo

Yokine

Named after Yokine Hill and Mount Yokine Golf Course. "Yokine" is an Aboriginal word (Beverley district) for the native dog. The hill situated on Williams Road was named by N.S. Bartlett in 1922 because it is so close to Native Dog Swamp. The hill was an important Trig Station and the land was referred to before this as part of Osborne Park.

See statistics for Yokine

Aerial image of Yokine

Infographic of Yokine

The Perth suburb of Yokine measures 4.851 square kilometres. It has a total population of 10613 people, of which 49.06% are male and 50.93% are female. 57.00% of residents were born in Australia, while 42.99% were born elsewhere. There has been a 1.3% increase in the median house price from 2013 – 2014. The median house price is $810,500 and there have been 21 property sales to date in 2015.

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This page was last updated on: 05 Sep 2018